I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:

Midwest Zine Fest  
Appears to be a white woman.

One of the LA Zine Fest posters. 
Appears to be a white woman.

Paper City in Melbourne. 
Appears to be a white young woman.

One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters. 
Appears to be a white woman.

Birmingham Zine Fest 
Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.

Belgium Feminism Fest? 
Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.

I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons.  It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.

When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well.  If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for.
And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational.  The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable.  It shows people somewhere with  many skin tones, even purple!  And all the people in this fanciful place are the same.  Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines!

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:

Midwest Zine Fest
Appears to be a white woman.

One of the LA Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Paper City in Melbourne.
Appears to be a white young woman.

One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Birmingham Zine Fest
Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.

Belgium Feminism Fest?
Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.

I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.

When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for.

And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines!

  1. catscardigansbooks reblogged this from americanlibraryassoc
  2. librarylinknj reblogged this from americanlibraryassoc and added:
    Very valuable food for thought. Poster-creating libraries (and, well, program planners of all types), take note!
  3. americanlibraryassoc reblogged this from kellymce
  4. thehannahmachine reblogged this from geekedlibrarian
  5. geekedlibrarian reblogged this from libralthinking
  6. peaty reblogged this from poczineproject
  7. heath-bear reblogged this from kellymce and added:
    Well said.
  8. libralthinking reblogged this from kellymce
  9. bibliovore reblogged this from kellymce
  10. kellymce reblogged this from poczineproject
  11. tooshortpants reblogged this from poczineproject
  12. queerandbrown reblogged this from poczineproject
  13. animatormama reblogged this from poczineproject
  14. gossipgrandpa420 reblogged this from poczineproject
  15. mythologisingme reblogged this from poczineproject
  16. poczineproject reblogged this from airhornoftruthandlove and added:
    Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton